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Land Rover Magazine Issue 40

  • Text
  • Wade
  • Global
  • Programme
  • Podcast
  • Vista
  • Yoonie
  • Dwayne
  • Dubai
  • Defender
  • Rover
In this issue, new Defender is put through its paces by two inspirational young adventurers as they prepare for an expedition to the South Pole. We also celebrate 50 years of Range Rover by taking a journey of discovery to Dubai. As well as looking back, we look to future as a group of visionaries explain the technologies that could change the future for all of us.

IT’S Eating insects

IT’S Eating insects has never been so sophisticated. Jimi Famurewa delves into the rising culinary art of gourmet entomophagy Red ants in a ginger and honey ‘amber’ at Alchemist Guacamole with a gold-sprayed grasshopper at Ella Canta NOT JUST CRICKETS PHOTO (ALCHEMIST): SØREN GAMMELMARK I n 2017, foraging-focused London restaurant Native had a serious ant problem. This was not, to be clear, the sort of issue caused by an infestation and solved by a quick phone call to pest control. No, it was rather that everything else on the fledgling establishment’s innovative menu – from wild mallard ragù to wood pigeon kebab – was being completely upstaged by one dish: petits fours of meadowsweet fudge, provocatively garnished with a scattering of wood ants. “Pictures [of the dish] had been all over Instagram, so we had people coming in for just one fudge between a table of two,” chuckles Imogen Davis, co-founder of Native alongside chef Ivan Tisdall-Downes. “I’d be looking at these people, having a tap water and up on a chair with their cameras, thinking, ‘You’re taking up two of my 20 chairs, guys.’” Here, in miniature, you have evidence of the unstoppable rise of insect gastronomy. Where once bug consumption brought to mind caterpillars inching across improperly washed salad leaves or a grisly forfeit on an outback-set reality TV show, now it is being embraced by some of the most cutting-edge, acclaimed restaurants on the planet. Take the tartare of charred avocado topped with nutty pearls of ant larvae at Mexico City’s pace-setting Quintonil; lamb brain adorned with edible flowers, citrussy ants and roasted mealworms at Copenhagen’s fantastical Alchemist; or even baby hornets slowcooked in soy and mirin at Yanagiya, Japan’s pilgrimage-worthy mountain restaurant. Suddenly, trailblazing menus are, well, crawling with thoughtfully prepared invertebrates. Insect advocates such as Alex Atala (of Michelin-starred São Paulo icon D.O.M) are asking why people who consume honey – ‘the excrement of a bee’ – can’t make this additional leap. Throw in the separate, Silicon Valley-backed movement to promote entomophagy (the official name for eating insects) as a vital alternative to intensively farmed, environmentally damaging meat production, and the trend looks like a perfect culinary storm. So, can this modern embrace of a scuttling ancient delicacy possibly last? What’s really driving it? And what does a crunch of feelers or a spurt of bug goo add to cuisine, beyond the sort of visceral shock that plays well on social media? Native’s ant, chocolate and mushroom dessert 64

 

Land Rover Magazine

 

Land Rover Magazine showcases stories from around the world that celebrate inner strength and the drive to go Above and Beyond.

In this issue, New Defender is put through its paces by two inspirational young adventurers as they prepare for an expedition to the South Pole. We also celebrate 50 years of Range Rover by taking a journey of discovery to Dubai. As well as looking back, we look to future as a group of visionaries explain the technologies that could change the future for all of us.

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