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Land Rover Magazine Issue 40

  • Text
  • Wade
  • Global
  • Programme
  • Podcast
  • Vista
  • Yoonie
  • Dwayne
  • Dubai
  • Defender
  • Rover
In this issue, new Defender is put through its paces by two inspirational young adventurers as they prepare for an expedition to the South Pole. We also celebrate 50 years of Range Rover by taking a journey of discovery to Dubai. As well as looking back, we look to future as a group of visionaries explain the technologies that could change the future for all of us.

LAND ROVER LABS LAND

LAND ROVER LABS LAND ROVER LABS WADE PROGRAMME The new Land Rover Defender introduces an innovative wading mode. Working within Land Rover’s Terrain Response system, it sets up the vehicle for wading through water, at the touch of a button. Here’s how it works B ack in the mid-1990s the second-generation Range Rover (P38) had a button on the dash with a picture of wading on it. That button simply changed the ride height using the car’s air suspension to make it easier to take on driving through water. However, 25 years on, the wading mode on the new Defender does a whole lot more. If you’re about to ford deep water, Land Rover’s advanced new Wade Programme will automatically set up your vehicle to get you through safely and confidently. Here’s how the Defender uses each component of the programme to deliver class-leading wading capability. Touchscreen display Wade Programme is selected using the central Pivi Pro infotainment system touchscreen*. Once activated, you can benefit from Wade Sensing, which allows you to visualise the depth of surrounding water while fording streams and deeper, less certain channels. This is designed to give you added confidence when you’re taking full advantage of the Defender’s deep water wading capability. Ride height For vehicles fitted with Air Suspension, as you approach a ford or stream, select Wade Programme in Terrain Response and the car is raised 75mm, putting you into the Defender’s standard off-road ride height. If, while fording, the vehicle senses that the water is deeper than expected – and coming up to the car’s maximum wading depth of 900mm – the system will automatically switch to ‘extended’ ride height, adding an additional 40mm. The ‘Mud and Ruts’ programme, which is automatically activated when you select Wade Programme, enables the car to sense fourwheel slip on the riverbed. If the system senses that there’s little forward progress it can work out that you’re either grounding out – meaning the underside of the vehicle is in contact with rocks or ruts beneath the water – or that you don’t have enough contact between the wheels and the surface. If either is the case, the Defender’s ride height is automatically increased. Always check route and exit before wading. *In-car features should be used by drivers only when safe to do so. Drivers must ensure they are in full control of the vehicle at all times. 900mm maximum wading depth (with Air Suspension) Throttle response and drivetrain In Wade Programme, the system selects a higher gear earlier, which in turn delivers a less aggressive throttle response and reduces the engine speed. From a driver’s perspective, this means that the throttle pedal is slightly damped, so you’re less likely to see a sudden increase from idling engine speed to moving at 2,500-3,000rpm. It slows the transition as the engine speed builds up, helping you to avoid suddenly over-revving the engine and either sucking a big gulp of air into the air intake system when you tip into the water, or getting bogged down in loose mud and gravel when you are wading. Heating and ventilation A challenge with some cars is that, when they are driven into a body of water, the hot exhaust system below the engine bay sets off lots of steam which is then pulled into the cabin through the air-conditioning system, misting up the car’s interior. Not with the Defender, though. Selecting Wade Programme automatically puts the Defender’s heating system into ‘recirculation mode’, which stops the cabin fogging up by recirculating the interior’s air. Brakes Once you’ve safely left the water, the car’s brake discs and pads are obviously very wet. As you leave the water the ABS system pre-loads the brakes slightly, providing a small amount of contact between the brake pads and disc. This clears the water from the surfaces of the brake disc and pads, ensuring that your Defender has optimum braking performance after it’s been through deep water. 72

 

Land Rover Magazine

 

Land Rover Magazine showcases stories from around the world that celebrate inner strength and the drive to go Above and Beyond.

In this issue, New Defender is put through its paces by two inspirational young adventurers as they prepare for an expedition to the South Pole. We also celebrate 50 years of Range Rover by taking a journey of discovery to Dubai. As well as looking back, we look to future as a group of visionaries explain the technologies that could change the future for all of us.

Jaguar Land Rover Limited: Registered office: Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry CV3 4LF. Registered in England No: 1672070